Naval Manument Tripoli Fieldguide to U.S. Public Monuments and Memorials Cabrillo
 
MAPPING & INFORMATION FEATURES
 
 
 
 
 
Monument Detail

On the Monument Detail page, the program will automatically place you in the Abbreviated database.
You may switch to another database at any time by clicking on the desired tab in the menu bar below.
Abbreviated Extended Complete Print
Introduction
1)
Title
New York 90th & 91st Regiments
2)
Town, State
Key West, FL
3)
ID #
1066
4)
Compilation Date (Initial)
April 15, 2003
5)
Compilation Date (Latest)
January 29, 2012
6)
Site Worked Last
February 11, 2012
Description
A Civil War monument of stone situated in Key West, Florida, recalls and honors 117 Union Army men from New York killed during the nation’s “war of the sixties,” mostly in 1862 by disease. The departed had volunteered for military duty and served on this tropical island, very far from home, in support of the Northern cause. Serving in the New York 90th and 91st Regiments, these men were a part of the Union Army garrisoned throughout the Civil War at Key West. The monument’s inscription notes that most of the men died from yellow fever. Also known as yellow jack, this hemorrhagic disease presents with pain, nausea and fever followed by, in the unfortunate, jaundice, or yellowing of the skin, and likely death. For centuries millions worldwide have been attacked by yellow fever, including many in the U.S. since early colonial times. It would be the late 19th century before the contagion technique for transmission of this disease was discovered – the mosquito – and yet another 70 years before an effective vaccine would be invented and available. Still today, however, many do not, or cannot, avail themselves of the vaccine.

• Designed by architect Edward Pearce Casey (1864-1940), this war memorial takes the form of a shaft. Made of Indiana limestone, to the architect’s specification, the piece stands 20 feet in height, resting on a concrete base of 20 feet square and topped by a funerary urn enveloped in ornamental relief which, according to the New York Times, “bears the arms of the State of New York on a field of entwined olive leaves.” The names of the deceased men and officers are engraved on its front, by regiment. Casey was born into the world of the built environment, if you will: his father, West Point graduate Brigadier General Thomas Lincoln Casey, a New Yorker, would become chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After Edward Pearce Casey’s engineering and architectural schooling, in New York and Paris, respectively, he returned to New York to practice architecture, and in 1892 was appointed to a very visible position -- supervising architect, to borrow Goode’s title -- working on the Library of Congress, especially its interiors. Casey was appointed supervising architect by the same federal manager who had terminated the library’s original architects of some 20 years, Smithmeyer and Pelz: Thomas Lincoln Casey, his father. For Edward Pearce Casey, other well-received U.S. assignments followed, among them: architect of the DAR’s Memorial Continental Hall (1905); the General Ulysses S. Grant Memorial (1922), on the Mall, in front of the nation’s capitol, where his work supported the artistry and craft of Shrady, Roman Bronze Works and Vermont Marble; and, in 1925 the New York State Auxiliary Monument at Gettysburg. This writer does not know how, or exactly when, the design/build team was chosen to create the NY 90th and 91st Regiments Memorial at Key West. But by the time Casey visited the key in February of 1929 in the company of Charles A. Shaw, chair, New York Monuments Commission, so as to site the memorial, Casey would seem to have for a project of this order of magnitude obvious, appropriate and effective credentials and relationships with New York state, federal government and U.S. military leaders. (Alternatively, his selection might have been by means of, say, a competition.) In this Key West monument effort, architect Casey was supported by Charles Kappes, and assistants, a monument erector from Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Over several weeks during July, 1929, Kappes and associates excavated the designated site, formed the work’s foundation and erected the monument as designed.

• This war monument was a gift of the state of New York to the city of Key West. The idea for the memorial as well as its planning and sponsorship were in large measure the product of the personal determination, not to mention the apparent political savvy, of Commander Alfred A. Lord -- leader of the Binghamton, New York, Grand Army of the Republic unit. He was also an army sergeant stationed at Key West during the Civil War; he knew first-hand the pain and suffering of his comrades’ deaths. If Commander Lord conceived the idea of the regimental monument, and only a short time before his death had indeed convinced the state legislature to proceed with and underwrite it, then soon after his passing it fell to Monuments Commissioner Shaw, himself a veteran, to drive the monument-acquisition process to completion. The idea of the monument’s having been conceived and born in New York, the art of the work then needed to be made real and installed in Florida. This latter portion of the process was guided by Key West city leaders and working groups -- civic officials, Chamber of Commerce principals and the Arthur Sawyer Post American Legion. In February, 1929, architect Casey, as noted above, journeyed with commissioner Shaw to survey with Key West directors possible sites; this enabled the parties to assemble information -- certainly as it might relate to Casey’s intended monument design -- and provide input for final site identification, ultimately Bayview Park

• The Bayview Park site of this Key West monument is located at Truman Avenue, near the corner where it intersects with Jose Marti Drive. (It is not known to the writer exactly when the memorialized dead were exhumed from their Key West graves and reinterred at the Barrancas National Cemetery, Pensacola, Florida – likely the 1860s, 1870s but before the monument’s dedication.) The monument’s dedication ceremony was scheduled in collaboration with Key West’s twelfth celebration of the nation’s Armistice Day. By this time, the Sawyer Post unit had a continuing program of honor for this special day, commemorating the close of the Great War, and the post’s plan was to incorporate the dedication of this new monument into the Legion’s now-traditional Armistice ceremony. From New York, a party comprised of 18 elected and government officials, family and friends as well as war veterans – Civil War, Spanish War and “the late” war: all travelled by train to Key West for the dedication. The Sawyer Legionnaires joined the New Yorkers dedicatory ceremony, the address for which was delivered by Albany state senator William Byrne. Though installed and completed in the summer of 1929, the monument was formally dedicated November 11, 1930.
Content
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
Self-sacrifice
2)
War Dead or those Serving and Dying
3)
Not Applicable
5)
Racially silent
6)
Civil War
Design
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1.)
Man-made
2.)
Inscription/Text Design
Integrated
3)
Geometric w/wo pedestal
4)
Stone/rock
5)
Large
7)
Inscribed/lettered directly
8)
Text available, all
9)
Yes (see below)
9.1)
Image numbering/location
6100-606.11, 6100-606.12, 6100-606.13, 6100-606.14
10)
Design Preservation
Satisfactory
11)
Inscript. Separate from M|M
No
12)
Designers
12.1)
Designer 1
Artist/Artistic Group: Casey, Edward Pearce
13)
Fabricators/Builders
Known
13.1)
Fabricator/Builder 1
Charles Kappes 
13.2)
Fabricator City
Gettysburg 
13.3)
Fabricator State
PA 
13.4)
Fabricator Country
United States 
Setting
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
Park/Garden/Lawn/Field
3)
Appearance/Setting
Completed
3.1)
Appeal of the Item
5 Good
3.2)
Setting appears appropriate
5 Good
3.3)
Traffic near for access, distanced for appreciation
4 Satisfactory
3.4)
Visualization and panorama
5 Good
3.5)
Opportunity to view, to enjoy the item
5 Good
3.6)
Overall Averaged Score
4.8 Good (Given a 1.0 - 7.0 Range)
To calculate comparative appearance estimates, CLICK HERE
4)
Not Entered
5)
November 11, 1930
6)
Not Entered
7)
Not Entered
10)
Other Monuments on Site
1061 , 1062 , 1063 , 1064 , 1065 , 1067 , 1068 , 1086
11)
Satisfactory
12)
Local government
Themes
1)
MonumentsandMemorials.com Themes
Roads and their Towns
2)
National Historic Landmark Themes
The Civil War
Demography
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
File Number
130
2)
Town/City
Key West
3)
County
Monroe
4)
District
Intentionally Blank
5)
State
FL
6)
Zip
33040
7)
Country
United States
8)
Latitude (GPS)
24.5578960000
9)
Longitude (GPS)
-81.7882450000
10)
Intersecting Street 1
Truman Ave
11)
Intersecting Street 2
Jose Marti Dr
12)
Additional Identifier 1
Bayview Park
13)
Additional Identifier 2
US-1
15)
Man-made
16)
16.1)
Government, Local
16.2)
Government, State
17)
Washington to Lincoln|1789-1865
18)
Compilation Date (Initial)
April 15, 2003
20)
Compilation Date (Latest)
January 29, 2012
21)
Compilation Technique (Latest)
21.1)
Correspondence
21.2)
Newspaper
21.3)
Website
22)
Source Originator
monumentsandmemorials.com
Comments and Notes
SPONSOR: Governmnet, State -- State of New York
SPONSOR: Government, Local -- City of Key West, Florida
SOURCES/1: James M. Good, Washington Sculpture, p. 770; James M. Goode, The Outdoor Sculpture of Washington, D.C., p. 77; SIRIS, various; Wikipedia, “Yellow Fever: entry retrieved January 30, 2012.
SOURCES/2: “Charles A. Shaw Pays Tribute to New York Heroes Buried Here,” The Key West Citizen, November 12, 1930; “New York Men who gave Lives for Union in Key West during Civil War,” The Key West Citizen, December, 28, 1928; “New York Monument Dedicated in Florida,” The New York Times, November 12, 1930; “Shaft to be Unveiled Tomorrow, Tribute to 117 of Nation’s Dead,” The Key West Citizen, November 10, 1930; “18 New Yorkers Here; Will Unveil Shaft to State’s Soldier Dead,” The Key West Citizen, November 10, 1930.
COMMENT: Truman Avenue in Key West variably titled US-1, US-1A and Overseas Highway






Privacy Policy Copyright ©2005 - Fieldguide to U.S. Public Monuments and Memorials Contact the Webmaster

Designed by RP Design Web Services