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Introduction
1)
Title
Hale Nathan
2)
Town, State
New York, NY
3)
ID #
1292
4)
Compilation Date (Initial)
September 06, 2002
5)
Compilation Date (Latest)
July 14, 2010
6)
Site Worked Last
March 30, 2014
Description
Nathan Hale (1755-1776), patriot and soldier in the War for Independence, is remembered and honored by this statue on the grounds of City Hall, New York, New York. Hale served in the militia of Connecticut and later in the Continental Army under George Washington, attaining the rank of captain. To give support to the army in the fall of 1776 during its difficult, and losing, struggle to secure New York City, the Yale graduate volunteered to spy on the British forces. Disguised as a school teacher – Hale had taught school in his home state – he successfully penetrated enemy lines. Some ten days later, however, he was caught, perhaps betrayed, and the following morning, September 22, 1776, Hale was hanged -- gone, in a New York minute, at the age of 21. His only regret, as the inscription on the monument makes clear, was that he could do it but once.

• Brooklyn-born Frederick William MacMonnies (1863-1937) conceived the monument, and it was awarded first prize in a juried competition, this when the sculptor himself was only 26. The work is a statue of the young patriot set on a cylindrical base of polished Massachusetts pink granite. There are inscriptions front and back, with bandeau around the base. There is no known image of Hale; MacMonnies worked from imagination. The bronze piece was made by Jaboeuf & Bezout Fondeurs, Paris; and the base the statue stands on was designed by noted architect Stanford White (1853-1906). The memorial was conserved in 1999 as a part of its relocation to its current position.

• The monument has always been situated at City Hall, though in several different places. Currently, it stands on the lawn immediately south of the entrance plaza, and steps, to City Hall. (Since September 11, 2001, much of the City Hall core campus is tightly constrained; see Comments and Notes, below.) Originally, the Hale stood at the southwest corner of City Hall Park as at that time it was believed to be the place, or near the place, where this early martyr was killed by the British (following the likes of Major General Joseph Warren on Bunker Hill, some 15 months prior).

• The Nathan Hale monument was, and is, sponsored by the Sons of the Revolution of New York State. It was originally dedicated November 25, 1893.
Content
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1)
Self-sacrifice
2)
War Dead or those Serving and Dying
3)
Military
5)
Caucasian
6)
War for Independence
Design
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1.)
Man-made
2.)
Inscription/Text Design
Integrated
3)
Statue(s) w/wo pedestal
4)
Stone/rock and metal
5)
Average (life-size)
7)
Inscribed/lettered directly
8)
Text available, all
9)
Yes (see below)
9.1)
Image numbering/location
2900-916.1, 2900-916.2, 2900-916.3, 2900-916.4, 2900-916.5, 2900-916.6, 2900-916.7, 2900-916.8, 2900-916.9
10)
Design Preservation
Good
11)
Inscript. Separate from M|M
No
12)
Designers
12.1)
Designer 1
Artist/Artistic Group: MacMonnies, Frederick William
12.2)
Designer 2
Artist/Artistic Group: White, Stanford
13)
Fabricators/Builders
Known
13.1)
Fabricator/Builder 1
Jaboeuf & Bezout Fondeurs 
13.2)
Fabricator City
Paris 
13.3)
Fabricator State
 
13.4)
Fabricator Country
France 
Setting
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1)
Park/Garden/Lawn/Field
3)
Appearance/Setting
Completed
3.1)
Appeal of the Item
5 Good
3.2)
Setting appears appropriate
5 Good
3.3)
Traffic near for access, distanced for appreciation
4 Satisfactory
3.4)
Visualization and panorama
4 Satisfactory
3.5)
Opportunity to view, to enjoy the item
3 Wanting
3.6)
Overall Averaged Score
4.2 Satisfactory (Given a 1.0 - 7.0 Range)
To calculate comparative appearance estimates, CLICK HERE
4)
1889
5)
November 25, 1893
6)
Not Entered
7)
Not Entered
8)
Tightly constrained
10)
Other Monuments on Site
1184 , 1288 , 1289 , 1290 , 1291 , 1294
11)
Satisfactory
12)
Local government
Themes
1)
MonumentsandMemorials.com Themes
No Perceived Theme Match
2)
National Historic Landmark Themes
The War for Independence
Demography
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1)
File Number
50A
2)
Town/City
New York
3)
County
New York
4)
District
Manhattan
5)
State
NY
6)
Zip
10007
7)
Country
United States
8)
Latitude (GPS)
40.7123260000
9)
Longitude (GPS)
-74.0062360000
10)
Intersecting Street 1
Park Row
11)
Intersecting Street 2
Frankfort St
12)
Additional Identifier 1
City Hall Park
13)
Additional Identifier 2
15)
Man-made
16)
DAR/SAR | Fraternal Organizations/Groups
17)
Revolution: War/Governance | 1774-1788
18)
Compilation Date (Initial)
September 06, 2002
19)
19.1)
Site Survey
19.2)
Book/Pamphlet/Text
19.3)
Government Materials
19.4)
Website
20)
Compilation Date (Latest)
July 14, 2010
21)
Compilation Technique (Latest)
21.1)
Site Survey
21.2)
Book/Pamphlet/Text
21.3)
Government Materials
21.4)
Website
22)
Source Originator
monumentsandmemorials.com
Comments and Notes
SITE DEVELOPMENT /1: Start date – assumed to be 1889, the year the sculptor was named winner of the Nathan Hale Memorial Competition.
SITE DEVELOPMENT /2: Dedication date -- 11/25/1893 "...the anniversary of Evacuation Day (commemorating the departure of the last British soldier from the colonies in 1783)." NYC Parks & Recreation site notice.
SPONSOR: DAR/SAR | Fraternal Organizations/Groups -- Sons of the Revolution of the State of New York. Currently, the organization is named The Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York.
ACCESS: Tightly constrained -- Situated on the grounds of City Hall. After 9/11/2001, its grounds are tightly restricted; public tours are routinely carried on, however, by City Hall staff. See link, above.
SOURCES/1: Bogart, Public Sculpture and the Civic Ideal in New York City, 1890-1930; Catalogue, Works of Art Belonging to New York City, Vol. I; Craven, Sculpture in America; Gayle and Cohen, Guide to Manhattan's Outdoor Sculpture; Lederer, All Around the Town; Reynolds, Monuments and Masterpieces; Saltus and Tisne, Statues of New York; Sharp, New York Public Sculpture; SIRIS; Taft, History of American Sculpture, p. 332 ff.
SOURCES/2: The following writing and notices about the monument are from The New York Times, as indicated: Daniel B. Schneider, “F.Y.I. But One Statue to Lose,” October 31, 1999; June 11, 1922; and, June 14, 1912.
COMMENT: Monument location changes --
Originally, situated in City Hall Park, west side, nearer Broadway and (then) Mail Street.
1st move: June 12, 1912, to front of City Hall, a temporary move to allow Broadway subway construction.
2nd move: June 10, 1922; re-dedicated June 14, 1922; to Broadway at Murray Street, southeast corner, park side.
3rd move: 1999, to the lawn, immediately south of the City Hall entranceway plaza, easterly.



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