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Introduction
1)
Title
Warren & Associates
2)
Town, State
Boston, MA
3)
ID #
1875
4)
Compilation Date (Initial)
June 19, 2010
5)
Compilation Date (Latest)
June 19, 2010
6)
Site Worked Last
November 03, 2013
Description
The monument honors Major-General Joseph Warren (1741-1775) and 114 other colonists killed at Bunker Hill, from Massachusetts Bay, New Hampshire and Connecticut militia units, in Charlestown, Massachusetts, on June 17, 1775. Fought by American militia in opposition to British regulars (268 dead), the battle is recognized as the first major, organized military encounter in the war for America’s independence. Joseph Warren, patriot and revolutionary, physician and resistance writer, was 34 years old when killed during the third, and final, siege by the British at Bunker Hill’s Breed’s Hill entrenchment site; he was also a leader of the Massachusetts Committee of Safety and, as president pro tempore, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress. Notably, the Warren and Associates monument will in time give birth to and reside within another: today’s Bunker Hill Monument (ID 1871). • The design of this monument, the “Warren,” takes the form of a Tuscan pillar. Its brick pedestal reached 10 feet in height on a perimeter of eight feet square. This base displayed dedicatory details on its south side. Constructed of wood, the pillar stretched upward another 18 feet, on top of which rested a guilt urn adorned with masonic emblems and the initials “J.W.” The monument’s makers are not known to the writer at this time, neither artist nor builder. This is one unknown; there are others. The Warren was erected on ground that was a part of Concord Street, close to the Breed’s Hill entrenchment where Warren and his patriotic associates fought and fell during the Bunker Hill battle: how long, exactly, this monument stood, is also not yet known to the writer – a second unknown. A third question: what happened to the original Warren? It was seemingly present in 1825 when its sponsor presented both monument and land to the Bunker Hill Monument Association, and it was supplanted by a model of the Warren, set within the obelisk, in 1845. Related, Frothingham writes that the sponsor “…in 1845, procured an exact model of the pillar, of the finest Italian marble, which was executed by one of the best American artists, and was placed within the obelisk.” (see citation, below). This, then, is a final unknown: which “best” American artist is Frothingham alluding to?

• This monument was the outcome of an initiative – it was sponsored -- by King Solomon’s Lodge of Freemasons, Charlestown (now a district of Boston), chartered September 6, 1783. Joseph Warren was a freemason and a leader of the Massachusetts Freemasons from its founding to his death. Gilbert Patten Brown, in 1916, asserts that “This was the first Masonic monument erected in this country.” King Solomon’s Lodge maintained the monument until 1825. On the 50th anniversary of the battle, it turned over the site to the Bunker Hill Monument Association, Daniel Webster, president. This change envisioned the Association’s then putting into place, as the work’s inscription would come to read, “a more imposing structure.” It is important to note that as a part of the site transfer arrangement the Monument Association agreed to allow King Solomon’s Lodge to install, as part of this new, “more imposing monument, a “Model” of the original Tuscan pillar. As it turned out, the new monument, an obelisk, with the Model pillar soon-to-be-situated in its base, was some 23 years in the making.

• The Warren was dedicated December 2, 1794. On June 24, 1845, the Warren Model, completed as agreed to by the Monument Association, was unveiled in a second dedicatory ceremony, in the just-completed, Bunker Hill obelisk. And 149 years later, on June 17, 1994, the Model was rededicated.
Content
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1)
Patriotism
2)
War Dead or those Serving and Dying
3)
Not Applicable
5)
Combination
6)
War for Independence
Design
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1.)
Man-made
2.)
Inscription/Text Design
Integrated
3)
Geometric w/wo pedestal
4)
Stone/rock and metal
5)
Average (life-size)
7)
Inscribed/lettered directly and on tablet
8)
Text available, partial
9)
Yes (see below)
9.1)
Image numbering/location
2900-924.1, 2900-924.2, 2900-924.3, 2900-924.4, 2900-924.5, 2900-924.6
10)
Design Preservation
Satisfactory
11)
Inscript. Separate from M|M
No
12)
Designers
12.1)
Designer 1
Not yet determined
13)
Fabricators/Builders
Not Yet Determined
Setting
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1)
Historic Landmark/Site
2)
Not Applicable
3)
Appearance/Setting
Not Applicable
To calculate comparative appearance estimates, CLICK HERE
4)
April 04, 1776
5)
December 02, 1794
6)
June 24, 1845
7)
June 17, 1994
10)
Other Monuments on Site
1871 , 1872 , 1873 , 1874
11)
Satisfactory
12)
FedGov-National Park Service
Themes
1)
MonumentsandMemorials.com Themes
No Perceived Theme Match
2)
National Historic Landmark Themes
The War for Independence
Demography
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1)
File Number
96
2)
Town/City
Boston
3)
County
Suffolk
4)
District
Charlestown
5)
State
MA
6)
Zip
02129
7)
Country
United States
8)
Latitude (GPS)
42.3770370000
9)
Longitude (GPS)
-71.0611130000
10)
Intersecting Street 1
Monument Square
11)
Intersecting Street 2
Concord Avenue
12)
Additional Identifier 1
Monument Avenue
13)
Additional Identifier 2
15)
Man-made
16)
16.1)
Community Group
16.2)
DAR/SAR | Fraternal Organizations/Groups
17)
Revolution: War/Governance | 1774-1788
18)
Compilation Date (Initial)
June 19, 2010
19)
19.1)
Site Survey
19.2)
Book/Pamphlet/Text
19.3)
Government Materials
19.4)
Promotional Materials
19.5)
Website
20)
Compilation Date (Latest)
Not Entered
21)
Compilation Technique (Latest)
22)
Source Originator
monumentsandmemorials.com
Comments and Notes
NAME: Joseph Warren (b. 6/11/1741, d. 6/17/1775) was a son to Mary Stevens and Joseph Warren (m. 5/29/1740, both of Roxbury). The father was a successful farmer; he also held several public offices.
CONTENT/1: General -- Numbers of dead and wounded, for British and colonists, vary by source; this database uses National Park Service figures.
CONTENT/2: Race/Ethnicity -- Combination: white, Native American (African Americans possible; under consideration).
DESIGN: General -- Design field descriptions selected based on current Model (in stone and metal) and not original Warren (in brick/wood/gilt urn.
DESIGN DESCRIPTION: Geometric -- Tuscan pillar
SITE DEVELOPMENT: Start Date – The logic, following Frothingham, pp. 522, 548, for the monument’s 4/4/1776 Start Date: having been buried in a shallow grave on the field of battle, immediately following, Warren’s body was discovered by his brother on March 24, 1776; it was identified April 4. Also on this date, the Massachusetts House of Representatives granted the request of the Ancient and Honorable Society of Free and Accepted Masons (the Major-General was its Grand Master throughout North America) to remove and re-inter Warren’s remains; as a part of its approval, the state government reserved a right to “have an opportunity to erect a monument to the memory of that worthy, valiant, and patriotic American.” (Not dissimilarly, the Continental Congress on 4/8/1777 passed the following resolution, in part: “That a monument be erected to the memory of General Warren, in the town of Boston, with the following inscription: -- “ While neither of these two government resolutions ever took effect, the idea that a monument to Warren should be built became palpable.
SPONSOR(S): King Solomon's Lodge of Freemasonry, Charlestown (chartered 9/6/1783), Boston, Massachusetts.
SPONSOR(S): Community Group -- Bunker Hill Monument Association.
SOURCES: American National Biography Online: Joseph Warren; Bridgman, Epitaphs from Copp’s Hill Burial Ground, Heritage Books, Inc., pp. 230-233; Brown, “The First Masonic Monument,” The American Tyler-Keystone, December, 1916: pp. 240-241; Frothingham, Life and Times of Joseph Warren, Applewood Books, pp. 508-526, 547-550; Frothingham, History of the Siege of Boston, and of the Battles of Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill. Also an Account of the Bunker Hill Monument, Digitized by Google, pp. 336-359; National Park Service, Boston National Historical Park pamphlets/publications (various); National Park Service, Nomination Form, National Register of Historic Places Inventory: Bunker Hill Monument; Wikipedia
COMMENT: Image no. 2900-924.1 courtesy Heritage Books, Inc., 100 Railroad Avenue, Suite 104, Westminster, MD 21157. See Link above.



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