Naval Manument Tripoli Fieldguide to U.S. Public Monuments and Memorials Cabrillo
 
MAPPING & INFORMATION FEATURES
 
 
 
 
 
Monument Detail

On the Monument Detail page, the program will automatically place you in the Abbreviated database.
You may switch to another database at any time by clicking on the desired tab in the menu bar below.
Abbreviated Extended Complete Print
Introduction
1)
Title
Katyn Massacre 1940 Memorial
2)
Town, State
Jersey City, NJ
3)
ID #
1902
4)
Compilation Date (Initial)
September 02, 2011
5)
Compilation Date (Latest)
September 02, 2011
6)
Site Worked Last
May 08, 2012
Description
The monument stands as both essence and symbol of mankind’s continuing need, apparently, to massacre its fellow men, women and children. The Russia-Germany military partitioning of Poland began September 1, 1939, with Germany’s invading western Poland, which for those of us in the U.S. typically marks the beginning of World War II. A few weeks later, on the 17th, Russia assaulted and occupied eastern Poland. The country’s military, 250,000 officers, soldiers and reserves, was seized and more than 20,000 of its officers were forced into prison camps in the Soviet Union. About 1.5 million Polish citizens were exiled to Siberia. This memorial recalls a forest named Katyń, not far from Smolensk, Russia. There, in the spring of 1940, some 5,000 of those Polish POW officers who had been captured during the 1939 Russian assault were systematically murdered. The Katyń forest was their killing field – meaning the Russian secret police, or NKVD, the People’s Commissariat for Internal Affairs. For the next 50 years, the Soviets refused to take responsibility for the massacres; they blamed the Nazis. (And who couldn’t believe that story?) But with sadness, repulsion and never-ending shock, we now know that the shootings of many thousands of Polish leaders -- individually, in the back of the head with a gun, personally, if you will, as the Russians finally began confessing to in 1989 – no, not the Nazis style, this. (They took mass murder to a whole new, unimaginable level, of course. But that’s a different memorial.)

• A stele atop a stepped base, both of granite, support a dramatic bronze statue of a man dressed in a military officer’s uniform and cap, mouth gagged, hands tied behind him, his back arched forward as a rifle’s bayonet impales him, through-and-through, from behind. Some 30-foot in height, the monument carries on three sides artwork and inscriptions, both incised and on plaques. And in relief on the east-facing side of the stele, is a woman carrying one child and holding the hand of another; above them reads a heading, “1939/Siberia.” Andrzei Pitynski created and sculpted the work. Born in Poland and graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts, Cracow, Pitynski came to the U.S. in 1974, and has worked here since. The founder for this piece was the Johnson Atelier, Mercerville, New Jersey.

• The monument is situated on Exchange Place, at the base of Montgomery Street, on the Jersey City Waterfront Walkway. Across the Hudson River to the east is the City of New York, the lower stretch of Manhattan. While Jersey City provided the public space, the Katyn Forest Monument Committee raised funds in the private sector to produce the work.

• One of the early, and substantial, supporters of the monument’s development, with his ardor, time and personal resources, was Stanley Paszul. Born in Poland in 1923, Paszul became a member of the Polish resistance movement and spent 11 years in Soviet custody, much of it in Siberia. After meeting up with his family in 1963 in the U.S., he, and they, lived and worked in New Jersey and became motivated to establish a remembrance to his tortured and murdered countrymen. This Paszul accomplished. During a reunion visit to Poland in 2008, he died, on December 16, at 85 years of age. The Katyń memorial was dedicated -- in a celebration that included a Catholic Mass with much of the ceremony in Polish – on May 19, 1991.
Content
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
Individual|group/family recognition
2)
Foreign national/NonAmerican
3)
Not Applicable
4)
Male and Female
5)
Caucasian
6)
World War II
Design
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1.)
Man-made
2.)
Inscription/Text Design
Integrated
3)
Statue(s) w/wo pedestal
4)
Stone/rock and metal
5)
Large
6)
Main + Three
7)
Inscribed/lettered directly and on tablet
8)
Text available, partial
9)
Yes (see below)
9.1)
Image numbering/location
2700-749.1, 2700-749.2, 2700-749.3, 2700-749.4, 2700-749.5, 2700-749.6, 2700-749.7, 2700-749.8, 2700-749.9
10)
Design Preservation
Good
11)
Inscript. Separate from M|M
No
12)
Designers
12.1)
Designer 1
Artist/Artistic Group: Pitynski, Andrzej
13)
Fabricators/Builders
Known
13.1)
Fabricator/Builder 1
Johnson Atelier 
13.2)
Fabricator City
Mercerville 
13.3)
Fabricator State
NJ 
13.4)
Fabricator Country
United States 
Setting
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
Plaza arrangement
2)
Open Space , Water
3)
Appearance/Setting
Completed
3.1)
Appeal of the Item
5 Good
3.2)
Setting appears appropriate
5 Good
3.3)
Traffic near for access, distanced for appreciation
5 Good
3.4)
Visualization and panorama
7 Exceptional
3.5)
Opportunity to view, to enjoy the item
6 Very Good
3.6)
Overall Averaged Score
5.6 Very Good (Given a 1.0 - 7.0 Range)
To calculate comparative appearance estimates, CLICK HERE
4)
Not Entered
5)
May 19, 1991
6)
Not Entered
7)
Not Entered
10)
Other Monuments on Site
1769 , 1900 , 1901
11)
Satisfactory
12)
Local government
Themes
1)
MonumentsandMemorials.com Themes
No Perceived Theme Match
2)
National Historic Landmark Themes
No Perceived Theme Match
Demography
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
File Number
61
2)
Town/City
Jersey City
3)
County
Hudson
4)
District
Intentionally Blank
5)
State
NJ
6)
Zip
07302
7)
Country
United States
8)
Latitude (GPS)
40.7162330000
9)
Longitude (GPS)
-74.0329520000
10)
Intersecting Street 1
Montgomery St
11)
Intersecting Street 2
Hudson St
12)
Additional Identifier 1
Exchange Place
13)
Additional Identifier 2
Waterfront Walkway
15)
Man-made
16)
16.1)
Government, Local
16.2)
Membership Group/Public Contribution
17)
1914-1945
18)
Compilation Date (Initial)
September 02, 2011
19)
19.1)
Site Survey
19.2)
Book/Pamphlet/Text
19.3)
Government Materials
19.4)
Website
20)
Compilation Date (Latest)
Not Entered
21)
Compilation Technique (Latest)
22)
Source Originator
monumentsandmemorials.com
Comments and Notes
NAME: Artist's first name "Andrzei," sometimes spelled "Andrzej."
CONTENT: Sex of Subject/Object: -- Male and Female. Wikipedia's writing about the Katyn Massacre mentions Porucznik (Lt.) Janina Lewandowskja, daughter of General Jozef Dowbor-Musnicki as a (sole) woman murdered at the Katyn site.
SPONSOR(S): Membership Group/Public Contribution -- Katyn Forest Monument Committee, Jersey City, NJ
SOURCES(S): Bzdak, Meredith Arms and Douglas Petersen, "Public Sculptures in New Jersey," pp. 188-189; National Katyn Memorial Foundation, Baltimore, MD, “The Katyn Massacre,” from its website, above, retrieved 9/3/2011; Liz Robbins, “Layers of History and Grief in Katyn,” The New York Times, April 10, 2010; SIRIS (retrieved 8/31/2011); Wikipedia: Katyn Massacre and Katyn Memorial (retrieved 9/1/2011).
CODE 7: Non-English languge -- Polish



Privacy Policy Copyright ©2005 - Fieldguide to U.S. Public Monuments and Memorials Contact the Webmaster

Designed by RP Design Web Services