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Introduction
1)
Title
Survivor Tree Memorial WTC 9/11
2)
Town, State
New York, NY
3)
ID #
1907
4)
Compilation Date (Initial)
September 30, 2011
5)
Compilation Date (Latest)
August 21, 2013
6)
Site Worked Last
April 02, 2014
Description
At the rebuilt World Trade Center in New York City stands a single Callery pear tree: this is the Survivor Tree memorial. Situated on the plaza of the city’s 9/11 national memorial, its powerful waterfalls and trade center-sized collection pools nearby (this database, ID#911), Survivor Tree tells the twin stories of loss and perseverance that befell New Yorkers and the nation after the death, destruction and profound social shock visited upon us September 11, 2001. And at a more personal level, Survivor embodies as well as symbolizes our individual pain and persistence: severely axed and chopped, fired, its limbs cut to stubs, it recalls men, women and children who, far from surviving, were put to death. And we too remember them, mourning yet accumulating the private strength to believe, to persevere, without them.

That autumn morning, 19 al-Qaeda terrorists coordinated the hijacking of four commercial jetliners. They smashed American Airlines Flight 11 into the Trade Center’s north tower and United Airlines Flight 175 into its south tower. The terrorists also commandeered two additional jetliners, crashing one, American Flight 77, into the Pentagon, in Arlington, Virginia (this database, ID#915); and a second, United Flight 93 -- passengers likely fighting the four on-board terrorists in an effort to re-take the jet -- was itself crashed into an open field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania (southeast of Pittsburgh, this database ID#914). Nearly 3,000 people from nations world-wide perished in these integrated criminal acts.

• Two complex objects, one designed and one natural, form and sustain the simplicity of the Survivor Tree memorial – the World Trade Center and pyrus calleryana, the Callery pear tree. Common to the streets of New York since the early 1960s, the Central Park Conservancy’s website notes that the deciduous Callery is a “quick grower and capable of co-existing very well with pollution and other conditions like de-icing salt and compaction....[it] actually seems to thrive under those conditions.” This post-attack, surviving Callery had grown up over some 30 years in a concrete planter located between towers 4 and 5, toward Church Street, on the east side of the WTC’s 16-acre campus. (Also, this Callery was not the only post-attack, surviving tree discovered on the WTC campus, as pointed out in Wikipedia’s entry on this topic. Six others – three little-leaf lindens and three calleries – were also planted in Manhattan, near City Hall and near the Brooklyn Bridge.)

The WTC project, situated on the Lower West Side of Manhattan, was designed by architect Minoru Yamasaki. Born in Seattle in 1912, a son of Japanese immigrant parents – and all that that meant on the West Coast of the U.S. leading into, and through, December 7, 1941 – Yamasaki grew up in poverty. He took his architecture degree from the University of Washington (1934) then, following a 10-year stint in New York, settled permanently, it turned out, in the Detroit area, ultimately creating by the late 1950s a successful firm, Minoru Yamasaki Associates. In 1962 this very small Detroit firm was chosen as one of seven finalists to compete for the very large New York WTC design project. And ultimately, Yamasaki was selected. To that point in time, his design work had been known for its “romantic, decorative buildings that would both soothe and delight the human spirit,'' to quote from Sara Rimer’s New York Times obituary of the architect. But, as life sometimes simply does not let us have it our way, the World Trade Center‘s twin towers that Yamasaki designed and caused to be built out between 1966 and 1987, with the blessing, indeed at the urging, of its sponsor, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey – they were massive, formal, unprecedented. Minoru Yamasaki died at the age of 73, in 1986.

• By mid-October, 2001, several weeks after Yamasaki’s WTC structures had absorbed the two jetliners and collapsed, disintegrating in seconds on television, Ground Zero rescue and recovery workers, including one Rebecca Clough, an employee in city government’s design and construction department, were seeking to identify from the preposterous mass of wreckage and heartache “any salvageable flora around ground zero,” in journalist David Dunlap’s words. Clough spied the Callery pear, not the only remaining tree, but it clearly qualified, and, surely, it would need care and support if it were to persevere. Arthur Ross (1910-2007), an early and persistent supporter of city parks, worked during the 1990s with NYC’s then-Parks and Recreation commissioner Betsy Gotbaum; indeed, he made generous donations to the city in order, among other things, to restore a forgotten gardening space in a distant city quarter, the northeast corner of Van Cortlandt Park, the Bronx. And it was into this space, by then named Arthur Ross Nursery, that Ms. Clough and workers from Parks and Recreation on October 31, 2001, transferred the surviving Callery pear from Ground Zero and then, on Veterans Day, replanted it. And thus the little eight-foot tree that could, and did, took additional baby steps toward becoming a U.S. public memorial.

• This memorial-building process took much time, effort and memory. Over the next nine years, Robert Zappala and Richard Cabo, parks department manager and field worker, respectively, at Arthur Ross Nursery provided for its care and support. Importantly, they also held on to the memory of Survivor Tree’s whereabouts while the memorial-building process continued to unfold some 15 miles south, near the tip of Lower Manhattan: during 2009, National September 11 Memorial & Museum leaders, headed by project manager Ronaldo Vega, prepared the plaza at the new World Trade Center site to accept the re-born, now 30-foot tall Survivor. Many dignitaries and government officials, survivors, families, friends and others witnessed the tree’s putting down its roots, literally, at its WTC home on the plaza of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, December 22, 2010, and also participated in its dedication, in a private ceremony, on September 11, 2011, 10 years after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. Survivor Tree memorial was opened to the public beginning September 12th.
At the rebuilt World Trade Center in New York City stands a single Callery pear tree: this is the Survivor Tree memorial. Situated on the plaza of the city’s 9/11 national memorial, its powerful waterfalls and trade center-sized collection pools nearby (this database, ID#911), Survivor Tree tells the twin stories of loss and perseverance that befell New Yorkers and the nation after the death, destruction and profound social shock visited upon us September 11, 2001. And at a more personal level, Survivor embodies as well as symbolizes our individual pain and persistence: severely axed and chopped, fired, its limbs cut to stubs, it recalls men, women and children who, far from surviving, were put to death. And we too remember them, mourning yet accumulating the private strength to believe, to persevere, without them.

That autumn morning, 19 al-Qaeda terrorists coordinated the hijacking of four commercial jetliners. They smashed American Airlines Flight 11 into the Trade Center’s north tower and United Airlines Flight 175 into its south tower. The terrorists also commandeered two additional jetliners, crashing one, American Flight 77, into the Pentagon, in Arlington, Virginia (this database, ID#915); and a second, United Flight 93 -- passengers likely fighting the four on-board terrorists in an effort to re-take the jet -- was itself crashed into an open field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania (southeast of Pittsburgh, this database ID#914). Nearly 3,000 people from nations world-wide perished in these integrated criminal acts.

• Two complex objects, one designed and one natural, form and sustain the simplicity of the Survivor Tree memorial – the World Trade Center and pyrus calleryana, the Callery pear tree. Common to the streets of New York since the early 1960s, the Central Park Conservancy’s website notes that the deciduous Callery is a “quick grower and capable of co-existing very well with pollution and other conditions like de-icing salt and compaction....[it] actually seems to thrive under those conditions.” This post-attack, surviving Callery had grown up over some 30 years in a concrete planter located between towers 4 and 5, toward Church Street, on the east side of the WTC’s 16-acre campus. (Also, this Callery was not the only post-attack, surviving tree discovered on the WTC campus, as pointed out in Wikipedia’s entry on this topic. Six others – three little-leaf lindens and three calleries – were also planted in Manhattan, near City Hall and near the Brooklyn Bridge.)
This post-attack, surviving Callery had grown up over some 30 years in a concrete planter located between towers 4 and 5, toward Church Street, on the east side of the WTC’s 16-acre campus.

The WTC project, situated on the Lower West Side of Manhattan, was designed by architect Minoru Yamasaki. Born in Seattle in 1912, a son of Japanese immigrant parents – and all that that meant on the West Coast of the U.S. leading into, and through, December 7, 1941 – Yamasaki grew up in poverty. He took his architecture degree from the University of Washington (1934) then, following a 10-year stint in New York, settled permanently, it turned out, in the Detroit area, ultimately creating by the late 1950s a successful firm, Minoru Yamasaki Associates. In 1962 this very small Detroit firm was chosen as one of seven finalists to compete for the very large New York WTC design project. And ultimately, Yamasaki was selected. To that point in time, his design work had been known for its “romantic, decorative buildings that would both soothe and delight the human spirit,'' to quote from Sara Rimer’s New York Times obituary of the architect. But, as life sometimes simply does not let us have it our way, the World Trade Center‘s twin towers that Yamasaki designed and caused to be built out between 1966 and 1987, with the blessing, indeed at the urging, of its sponsor, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey – they were massive, formal, unprecedented. Minoru Yamasaki died at the age of 73, in 1986.

• By mid-October, 2001, several weeks after Yamasaki’s WTC structures had absorbed the two jetliners and collapsed, disintegrating in seconds on television, Ground Zero rescue and recovery workers, including one Rebecca Clough, an employee in city government’s design and construction department, were seeking to identify from the preposterous mass of wreckage and heartache “any salvageable flora around ground zero,” in journalist David Dunlap’s words. Clough spied the Callery pear, not the only remaining tree, but it clearly qualified, and, surely, it would need care and support if it were to persevere. Arthur Ross (1910-2007), an early and persistent supporter of city parks, worked during the 1990s with NYC’s then-Parks and Recreation commissioner Betsy Gotbaum; indeed, he made generous donations to the city in order, among other things, to restore a forgotten gardening space in a distant city quarter, the northeast corner of Van Cortlandt Park, the Bronx. And it was into this space, by then named Arthur Ross Nursery, that Ms. Clough and workers from Parks and Recreation on October 31, 2001, transferred the surviving Callery pear from Ground Zero and then, on Veterans Day, replanted it. And thus the little eight-foot tree that could, and did, took additional baby steps toward becoming a U.S. public memorial.

• This memorial-building process took much time, effort and memory. Over the next nine years, Robert Zappala and Richard Cabo, parks department manager and field worker, respectively, at Arthur Ross Nursery provided for its care and support. Importantly, they also held on to the memory of Survivor Tree’s whereabouts while the memorial-building process continued to unfold some 15 miles south, near the tip of Lower Manhattan: during 2009, National September 11 Memorial & Museum leaders, headed by project manager Ronaldo Vega, prepared the plaza at the new World Trade Center site to accept the re-born, now 30-foot tall Survivor. Many dignitaries and government officials, survivors, families, friends and others witnessed the tree’s putting down its roots, literally, at its WTC home on the plaza of the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, December 22, 2010, and also participated in its dedication, in a private ceremony, on September 11, 2011, 10 years after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. Survivor Tree memorial was opened to the public beginning September 12th.

Content
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
Loss & perseverance
3)
Not Applicable
4)
Not applicable
5)
Not applicable
6)
Not Applicable
Design
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1.)
Terrestrial
2.)
Inscription/Text Design
Under Consideration
3)
Earthworks
4)
Landscaping
5)
Average (life-size)
7)
Under Consideration
9)
Yes (see below)
9.1)
Image numbering/location
2700-704.1, 2700-704.2, 2700-704.3, 2700-704.4, 2700-704.5, 2700-704.6
10)
Design Preservation
Good
11)
Inscript. Separate from M|M
Yes
11.1)
Parallel Description
Under Consideration
11.2)
Parallel Preservation
Under Consideration
11.3)
Parallel Scale Inscription/Text
Under Consideration
12)
Designers
13)
Fabricators/Builders
Known
13.1)
Fabricator/Builder 1
Arthur Ross Nursery 
13.2)
Fabricator City
New York  
13.3)
Fabricator State
NY 
13.4)
Fabricator Country
United States 
Setting
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1)
Plaza arrangement
2)
Open Space , Water
3)
Appearance/Setting
Completed
3.1)
Appeal of the Item
5 Good
3.2)
Setting appears appropriate
5 Good
3.3)
Traffic near for access, distanced for appreciation
4 Satisfactory
3.4)
Visualization and panorama
6 Very Good
3.5)
Opportunity to view, to enjoy the item
7 Exceptional
3.6)
Overall Averaged Score
5.4 Good (Given a 1.0 - 7.0 Range)
To calculate comparative appearance estimates, CLICK HERE
4)
November 11, 2001
5)
September 11, 2011
6)
Not Entered
7)
Not Entered
10)
Other Monuments on Site
910 , 911 , 1365 , 1390 , 1391 , 1610 , 1611 , 1612 , 1615
11)
Satisfactory
12)
Community Group/Not For Profit
Themes
1)
MonumentsandMemorials.com Themes
No Perceived Theme Match
2)
National Historic Landmark Themes
No Perceived Theme Match
Demography
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1)
File Number
50A
2)
Town/City
New York
3)
County
New York
4)
District
Manhattan
5)
State
NY
6)
Zip
10006
7)
Country
United States
8)
Latitude (GPS)
40.7111150000
9)
Longitude (GPS)
-74.0136190000
10)
Intersecting Street 1
Liberty St
11)
Intersecting Street 2
Church St
12)
Additional Identifier 1
National 9/11 Memorial Plaza
13)
Additional Identifier 2
15)
Terrestrial
16)
16.1)
Educational entity
16.2)
Government, Local
16.3)
Government, State
16.4)
Membership Group/Public Contribution
17)
2001-current
18)
Compilation Date (Initial)
September 30, 2011
19)
19.1)
Site Survey
19.2)
Newspaper
20)
Compilation Date (Latest)
August 21, 2013
21)
Compilation Technique (Latest)
21.1)
Book/Pamphlet/Text
21.2)
Newspaper
21.3)
Website
21.4)
Other
22)
Source Originator
monumentsandmemorials.com
Comments and Notes
STORY SUBJECTS/OBJECTS: Thing -- Tree
DEVELOPMENT: Start date of 11/11/2001 retrieved from the article by Lauinger/NYDailyNews.com, below.
SITE MAINTENANCE: Community Group/Not for Profit -- The National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the World Trade Center Foundation, Inc., New York, NY.
SPONSOR(S): Government, State -- States of New York and New Jersey through their Port Authority of NY and NJ joint entity; Educational entity -- The National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the World Trade Center Foundation, Inc., New York, NY.
SOURCES 1:
Jeffrey Cronin, "Yamasaki, Minoru," American National Biography Online Feb. 2000, retrieved May 12, 2013;
David W. Dunlap, “This Star Search Hunts for Trees Worthy of Memorial,” The New York Times, September 19, 2006; “9/11 Survivor Blooms in Bronx,” The New York Times, May 1, 2009;
Ralph Gardner, Jr., “Also Rising Since 9/11,” Wall Street Journal, September 17, 2012;
John Lauinger, “Scorched ‘survivor tree’ Rescued from Ground Zero after Attacks to Get New Home at 9/11 Museum,” NYDailyNews.com, September 6, 2010;
Mark Memmott, “Tree that Survived 9/11 Attack is Replanted at Ground Zero, http://www.npr.org, December 23, 2010;
Sara Rimer, “Minour Yamasaki, Architect of World Trade Center, Dies,” The New York Times, February 9, 1986;
Anthony Robins, The World Trade Center, 1987;
Allie Skayne, “The Survivor Tree: A Story of Hope and Healing,” brochure (photo editor Shanell Bryan, design by Weilco) published by the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, New York, NY, ca. Nov., 2012.
SOURCES 2:
Joe Daniels, “A Look Back at 2012 and Best Wishes for the New Year,” e-mail correspondence from the president/ CEO 9/11 Memorial and Museum to members, December 28, 2012; National September 11 Memorial & Museum website, Timeline feature, retrieved August 14, 2013;
Wikipedia, “Survivor Tree” feature, a part of “National September 11 Memorial & Museum” entry, retrieved 4/2/2014.



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