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Monument Detail

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Introduction
1)
Title
Civil War
2)
Town, State
Ossining, NY
3)
ID #
1911
4)
Compilation Date (Initial)
September 29, 2009
5)
Compilation Date (Latest)
September 29, 2009
6)
Site Worked Last
December 04, 2011
Description
The monument remembers soldiers of Ossining, New York, who died fighting in the Civil War. Those killed were men, both privates and officers, most from the 17th U.S. Volunteer Regiment and the 6th U.S. Heavy Artillery. • One of two Civil War remembrances in Ossining, this 21-foot tall statue, approximately, of a standing soldier in uniform and made of bronze is positioned atop a granite obelisk; an attached bronze plaque lists the 42 names of the lost soldiers that it honors. Maurice J. Power, a New York sculptor, designed and created the monument. The National Fine Arts Foundry, owned by Power and also situated in Manhattan, at 218 East 25 Street, New York, cast the work. This firm produced, or participated in the creation of, a number of lasting battle monuments, for instance that at Monmouth, New Jersey. • The sculpture was sponsored by the Sing Sing Monument Committee. Formed in January, 1887, to create this monument, the group was led by Colonel Edwin McAlpin and comprised of a wide-range of prominent community men. The colonel was a resident of the village and commander of the 71st Infantry Regiment, New York National Guard. A large parade, featuring both military troops and civic groups, prepared the village and parade onlookers for the work’s dedication, Decoration Day, May 30, 1887. • The memorial was installed that May day on North Highland Avenue (also known as U.S. 9 or the Albany Post Road) at its cross with Croton Avenue, called Hubbell’s Corners. However, as the village changed and expanded, so did this intersection. And as regards the monument, the intersection site became burdensome; the sculpture was therefore relocated in September of 1930 to its current location at the juncture of Brookville Avenue and Pleasantville Road.
Content
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1)
Self-sacrifice
2)
War Dead or those Serving and Dying
3)
Not Applicable
5)
Caucasian
6)
Civil War
Design
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1.)
Man-made
2.)
Inscription/Text Design
Integrated
3)
Statue(s) w/wo pedestal
4)
Stone/rock and metal
5)
Average (life-size)
7)
Inscribed/lettered on tablet
8)
Text available, all
9)
Yes (see below)
9.1)
Image numbering/location
2700-713.1, 2700-713.2, 2700-713.3, 2700-713.4, 2700-713.5 2700-713.6 2700-713.7 2700-713.8
10)
Design Preservation
Good
11)
Inscript. Separate from M|M
No
12)
Designers
12.1)
Designer 1
Artist/Artistic Group: Power, Maurice J.
13)
Fabricators/Builders
Known
13.1)
Fabricator/Builder 1
National Fine Art Foundry 
13.2)
Fabricator City
New York 
13.3)
Fabricator State
NY 
13.4)
Fabricator Country
United States 
13.5)
Fabricator/Builder 2
M.J. Power, Bronze Founder, NY
Setting
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1)
Park/Garden/Lawn/Field
3)
Appearance/Setting
Completed
3.1)
Appeal of the Item
5 Good
3.2)
Setting appears appropriate
4 Satisfactory
3.3)
Traffic near for access, distanced for appreciation
4 Satisfactory
3.4)
Visualization and panorama
4 Satisfactory
3.5)
Opportunity to view, to enjoy the item
5 Good
3.6)
Overall Averaged Score
4.4 Satisfactory (Given a 1.0 - 7.0 Range)
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4)
January 1887
5)
May 30, 1887
6)
September 1930
7)
Not Entered
10)
Other Monuments on Site
11)
Satisfactory
12)
Local government
Themes
1)
MonumentsandMemorials.com Themes
No Perceived Theme Match
2)
National Historic Landmark Themes
The Civil War
Demography
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1)
File Number
20
2)
Town/City
Ossining
3)
County
Westchester
4)
District
Intentionally Blank
5)
State
NY
6)
Zip
10562
7)
Country
United States
8)
Latitude (GPS)
41.1650220000
9)
Longitude (GPS)
-73.8474180000
10)
Intersecting Street 1
Pleasantville Rd
11)
Intersecting Street 2
Brookville Ave
12)
Additional Identifier 1
Monument Park
13)
Additional Identifier 2
15)
Man-made
16)
Membership Group/Public Contribution
17)
Washington to Lincoln|1789-1865
18)
Compilation Date (Initial)
September 29, 2009
19)
19.1)
Site Survey
19.2)
Government Materials
19.3)
Journal
19.4)
Website
20)
Compilation Date (Latest)
Not Entered
21)
Compilation Technique (Latest)
22)
Source Originator
monumentsandmemorials.com
Comments and Notes
TITLE ALTERNATE: Soldiers’ Monument
DESIGN: The list of names of the dead varies slightly between Civil War Kneeling Angel (ID#1912: 1879)/Scharf (1886) and Civil War (ID#1911: 1887). The latter plaque lists a seventh officer: Charles C. Hyatt (Capt. 13th U.S.I.). And, for the privates, George Powell is removed and John Williams (Co. 1, 95th N.Y.I.) is added. In sum, as of the ladder work’s 1887 dedication date, the list included 7 officers and 35 privates – 42 total killed.
SPONSOR: Membership Group/Public Contribution -- Sing Sing Monument Committee, directed by Colonel Edwin McAlpin, Commander, 71st infantry Regiment, New York National Guard.
SOURCES: Miguel Hernandez, "Ossining's Civil War Monuments," The Ossining Historical Register, Winter, 2011, pp. 6-9; J. Thomas Scharf, History of Westchester County, New York, Vol. II, pp. 321-365; SIRIS.
COMMENT (1): In Scharf’s work, published in 1886, the Civil War is referred to as the War of the Rebellion.
COMMENT (2): Today’s Ossining area became known as Sing Sing after the American colonies’ War for Independence from Britain (1783). When the Dutch moved into the Hudson Valley in the early 17th century, a Mohegan tribal group called the "Sint Sinck” inhabited the area. It was later (1685) acquired by Frederick Philipse and made a part of the family’s Manor of Philipsburg, some 165,000 acres. Dutch, French and English tenant farmers leased the land until after the Philipse family, Loyalists, was ousted by the new New York State government. The properties were auctioned off, many, according to the town’s web site, to the tenant farmers who had worked them, especially those who had supported the American cause. At that time, the area became known as Sing Sing. And it remained so until March 25, 1901, when the village changed the name to Ossining.
COMMENT (3): Among other battle works cited by Hernandez, above, are those at Newburgh, Albany and Buffalo, New York, as well as Clinton, Holyoke, Lawrence and Springfield, Massachusetts.





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