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Introduction
1)
Title
New Jersey 9/11 Empty Sky
2)
Town, State
Jersey City, NJ
3)
ID #
1915
4)
Compilation Date (Initial)
April 16, 2012
5)
Compilation Date (Latest)
April 16, 2012
6)
Site Worked Last
May 06, 2012
Description
The memorial honors 746 people of the state of New Jersey who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. They were killed when terrorists hijacked four U.S. commercial jetliners and crashed them into the Pentagon, in Arlington, Virginia; a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania; and into the twin towers at the World Trade Center, New York, New York. The remembrance of this day of hatred and recovery, positioned along the Hudson River’s west bank, is situated within the northeast section of Liberty State Park, in Jersey City. The park itself serves as an especially meaningful place for this 9/11 memorial, designated the New Jersey State September 11th Memorial. In more every-day times, the park participates in the completion of a myriad of important public assignments, such as launch point for craft carrying visitors to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. But on that September morning, ringingly clear and crisp, and into its afternoon and evening, the park would change into a staging area for rescue and triage operations, assisting thousands of New Jersey residents fleeing the destruction and death in Manhattan. But many residents, we know, would not make it back across the Hudson, and the loved ones of these vanished – the memorial’s inscription says “murdered” -- learned of this inconceivable news while waiting in Liberty State Park. The memorial’s two walls of steel – a work of remembrance and honor, called “Empty Sky” -- mourn for New Jersey’s many families, friends and citizens.

• Frederic Schwartz, New York architect and planner, designed the memorial in partnership with Jessica Jamroz. Massachusetts-based, she would later, in 2004, join Frederic Schwartz Architects to execute and complete the development of this jury-approved New Jersey state 9/11 design. Frederic Schwartz Architects with Arnold Associates, Princeton, New Jersey, designed the landscape architecture for the project. Schwartz was educated and trained at the University of California, Berkley, and at Harvard. In national and international settings, his design works have been both complimented and rewarded. More particularly, he and Jamroz worked together, also, to create and put in place another 9/11 memorial, called “The Rising,” for Westchester County, New York, ID# 1484 in this database. For its design selection process, New Jersey decided its search would be international in scope. Design selection leadership also set and shared preferred and necessary memorial characteristics as well as milestones against which to measure progress. Notably, in this selection process both design professionals and victims’ family members and survivors were to be involved, the latter pair making the final selection. By the end of June, 2004, the committee of survivors and families of the deceased unanimously chose the Schwartz and Jamroz design, “Empty Sky.” Hall Construction Co., Inc., Farmingdale, New Jersey, was identified as the general contractor for the project. On September 10, 2004, there took place a ground breaking ceremony attended by a diverse and deep group that numbered survivors and families of the deceased, elected officials, including the governor, developers and the press. Seven years would pass, however, before the memorial would be dedicated. Some of the lapsed time could be attributed to the normal push and pull of design development and capital acquisition processes as well as private fundraising challenges, all of which typically are not very tidy. But much could also be attributed to a tense legal dispute about the proposed site of the memorial within the park.

• Located at the Hudson River’s edge on almost two acres of land, the New Jersey State September 11th Memorial looks across the water towards the City of New York. The site of the remembrance features a large mound of earth sloping gently eastward, towards the river. Through this slope, twin walls of steel, made of marine-grade plates, slice into and through its underlying earthworks – a symbolic image, perhaps, of the twin towers lying on their sides. A visitor is met at the memorial’s west end approach, its parking area side, by two intersecting pieces of steel recovered from the WTC. Past these tortured artifacts, one passes into and between the two walls that carry the hundreds of names. Pulling an observer’s gaze toward the empty sky of the World Trade Center site, these twin walls stand an imposing 30 feet in height and near-210 feet long, the two separated by a 12-foot bluestone walkway. Crystal Metalworks, Inc., of Hatfield, Pennsylvania, a unit of Crystal Steel Fabricators, Inc., fabricated, finished and installed the walls. This construct embodies the story of the memorial and holds the 746 names of New Jersey’s 9/11 dead. (Whether intended or not, walls this high, spaced so comparative close and extending 200-plus feet might cause one to feel not a little enclosed – here too, perhaps, not unlike the towers themselves at a certain point in time?) The names of those who died are etched into these brushed stainless steel partitions. The work was performed by Great Lakes Etching & Finishing Company, Cleveland. For placing the names on the walls, the chosen convention is at random with a mechanism on-site to locate a given name and identify its position on the walls. As all names are reachable and viewable, each can also be touched. At the four ends of the two walls, inscribed plaques share the memorial’s narrative. See the Comments/Notes box, below, at the end of this database for the the text of each.

• The memorial is sponsored jointly by the State of New Jersey, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey as well as a newly created New Jersey 9/11 Memorial Foundation. Owned and operated by the State of New Jersey, it established this non-profit foundation in April, 2008 to support memorial-related activities, such as site maintenance and conducting events and programs. The Foundation also performs fundraising, which in the face of the U.S. economic recession throughout the second half of the century’s first decade was very challenging. On October 3, 2001 Acting Governor Donald T. DiFrancesco issued Executive Order #134 creating the New Jersey World Trade Center Victims Memorial Commission. This date is taken to be, for database development purposes, the memorial’s Start Date. The following year, in August, Gov. James E. McGreevy established the New Jersey Family and Survivor Memorial Committee. Ultimately, in June 2004, it was this committee, with support of design professionals and others, that selected the memorial’s final design from among many registered (668) and qualifying (330) proposals submitted to the state . A group, Friends of Liberty State Park, brought a lawsuit against the government to try to block the memorial’s construction at the northeast corner of Liberty State Park (near the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island ferry terminal and next to the historic Central Railroad of New Jersey (CRRNJ) Train Terminal) which the memorial committee, and others, had identified as the preferred site. The usually supportive Friends noted it was not against placing the memorial in the park; but rather, the identified location would block for future generations the current view of the Manhattan skyline, and there were other locations within the park that could also serve the purpose. The Friends effort, though supported by politicians and Jersey City citizens alike, failed. WTC survivors, friends and families of survivors and of victims, together with the state’s leaders, Gov. Chris Christie and five prior governors – all were in attendance alongside other elected officials, members of state government, the military and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for the dedication of the New Jersey State September 11th Memorial on September 10, 2011.
Content
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
Individual|group/family recognition
2)
Group of common citizens/persons
3)
Not Applicable
4)
Male and Female
5)
Combination
6)
Not Applicable
Design
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1.)
Man-made
2.)
Inscription/Text Design
Integrated
3)
Geometric w/wo pedestal
4)
Stone/rock and metal
5)
Big
6)
Main + Two
7)
Inscribed/lettered directly
8)
Text available, partial
9)
Yes (see below)
9.1)
Image numbering/location
3300-301.1, 3300-301.2, 3300-301.3, 3300-301.4, 3300-301.5, 3300-301.6, 3300-301.7, 3300-301.8, 3300-301.9, 3300-301.10
10)
Design Preservation
Good
11)
Inscript. Separate from M|M
No
12)
Designers
12.1)
Designer 1
Artist/Artistic Group: Schwartz, Frederic
12.2)
Designer 2
Artist/Artistic Group: Jamroz, Jessica
13)
Fabricators/Builders
Known
13.1)
Fabricator/Builder 1
Crystal Metalworks, Inc. 
13.2)
Fabricator City
Hatfield 
13.3)
Fabricator State
PA 
13.4)
Fabricator Country
United States 
13.5)
Fabricator/Builder 2
Hall Construction Co., Inc.
13.6)
Fabricator/Builder 3
Arnold Associates
Setting
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
Park/Garden/Lawn/Field
2)
Open Space , Water
3)
Appearance/Setting
Completed
3.1)
Appeal of the Item
5 Good
3.2)
Setting appears appropriate
7 Exceptional
3.3)
Traffic near for access, distanced for appreciation
6 Very Good
3.4)
Visualization and panorama
7 Exceptional
3.5)
Opportunity to view, to enjoy the item
6 Very Good
3.6)
Overall Averaged Score
6.2 Very Good (Given a 1.0 - 7.0 Range)
To calculate comparative appearance estimates, CLICK HERE
4)
October 03, 2001
5)
September 10, 2011
6)
Not Entered
7)
Not Entered
10)
Other Monuments on Site
11)
Satisfactory
12)
State government
Themes
1)
MonumentsandMemorials.com Themes
No Perceived Theme Match
2)
National Historic Landmark Themes
No Perceived Theme Match
Demography
Note: click on brown link to view distribution of field selections in database
1)
File Number
61
2)
Town/City
Jersey City
3)
County
Hudson
4)
District
Liberty State Park
5)
State
NJ
6)
Zip
07305
7)
Country
United States
8)
Latitude (GPS)
40.7083080000
9)
Longitude (GPS)
-74.0353950000
10)
Intersecting Street 1
Audrey Zapp Dr
11)
Intersecting Street 2
Freedom Way
12)
Additional Identifier 1
13)
Additional Identifier 2
15)
Man-made
16)
16.1)
Auxiliary support group
16.2)
Citizens/residents
16.3)
Government, State
17)
2001-current
18)
Compilation Date (Initial)
April 16, 2012
19)
19.1)
Site Survey
19.2)
Correspondence
19.3)
Government Materials
19.4)
Journal
19.5)
Newspaper
19.6)
Website
20)
Compilation Date (Latest)
Not Entered
21)
Compilation Technique (Latest)
22)
Source Originator
monumentsandmemorials.com
Comments and Notes
TITLE: The New Jersey State September 11th Memorial
DESIGN: Methodology – Of the 746 names included in the memorial, 49 had “strong ties” to New Jersey but were not necessarily residents of the state on 9/11/2001. Memorial leaders felt they wanted to “include” rather than “exclude” names.
SITE MAINTENANCE: State government -- State of New Jersey, Department of Environment Protection, Division of Parks and Forests
LEAD SPONSOR(S): Auxiliary support group -- New Jersey 9/11 Memorial Foundation; Government, State -- New Jersey individually and with New York via the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.
SOURCES: Sarah Boxer, “New Jersey Selects Its Sept. 11 Memorial,” The New York Times, July 1, 2004; John Holl, New Jersey’s Memorial to Face Ground Zero From the River,” The New York Times, July 1, 2004; Abigail Marshall, “New Jersey and 9/22,” To the Editor, The New York Times, July 3, 2004; Ana M. Alaya, “9/11 Walls will Ruin City View, Some Say,” The Star-Ledger/nj.com, August 17, 2006; Jack Herman, “State Moves Ahead with 9/11 Memorial,” The Jersey Journal, August 18, 2006; Jeff McKay, “Lawsuit Against 9/11 Memorial Prompted by Threat to River View,” Cybercast News Service/CNSNews.com, March 12, 2007; Jonathan Miller, “Sept. 11 Tribute Faces Legal Challenge,” The New York Times, March 25, 2007; Jennifer V. Hughes, “Planned 9/11 Memorial in Jersey City Faces Many Uncertainties,” The New York Times, April 17, 2009; Kathleen O’Brien, “Gov. Chris Christie Visits Liberty State Park’s 9/11 Memorial,” The Star-Ledger, August 31, 2011; Jessica Calefati, “Empty Sky 9/11 Memorial Opens in Jersey City with Emotional Ceremony,” The Star-Ledger, September 11, 2011.
NOTE (1): Inscription text (A) – North Wall, west end and South Wall, east end:
“Empty Sky: New Jersey / September 11th Memorial / On the morning of / September 11, 2001, with the skies / so clear that the Twin Towers / across the river appeared to be / within reach, the very essence / of what our country stands for -- / freedom, tolerance, and the / pursuit of happiness – was attacked. / This memorial is dedicated to / New Jersey’s innocent loved ones / who were violently and senselessly / murdered that day at the / World Trade Center, The Pentagon, / and in Shanksville, PA.”
NOTE (2): Inscription text (B) -- North Wall, east end and South Wall, west end: “Empty Sky: New Jersey / September 11th Memorial / Let this memorial / reflect the legacies of those / whose lives were lost / that their unfulfilled dreams / and hopes may result in a / better future for society. / Their unique qualities / and characteristics enriched / our lives immeasurably, / and through this memorial their stories shall live on.”




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